Scene Challenge of the Week

Happy-Hug-day-2013-Facebook-Timeline-covers-HD-wallpapers-Images-and-pictures12-e1387008364928Yay for politics! Aren’t you all super-psyched about the upcoming elections? No?… Really? You can’t stand the endless commercials, the arrogance of both sides, or the blatant lies that both sides then parse into something that is, in some way, beneficial for them? Good. I can’t stand it either. However, I do hope that all of you are actually paying attention to the candidates and figuring out who, if anyone, you actually want in office. While I’m not going to tell you that it is your moral obligation or your responsibility to vote (honestly, I think that there is an important place for conscientious abstainers), I am going to tell you that it is your responsibility to know whether there’s anyone that you want to vote for, and if so, who. Anyway, it’s time for a scene challenge. If you can’t remember the rules, I’ll provide them: I provide you with specific rules for how to write a particular scene.  Try to keep your scene under five hundred words, and try to keep it in the same tone as the introduction.  If I give a line that is very dark and depressing, then I don’t want to see a scene about a drunken monkey in a tutu…it just doesn’t fit.  If I do give you a line about a drunken monkey in a tutu, then you should probably try for a funny scene.

Your Challenge: I want you to write a comforting scene. This is going to be a variation of the movie/book scene challenges we’ve done in the past. Choose one of your favorite scenes from a good book or movie that evokes a sense of warmth, peace, calm, or comfort. There are parts of Lars Walker, Stephen Lawhead, and David Eddings that are very effective at this. However, instead of simply rewriting the scene, I want you to write a version of what happens that is entirely your own. Your own voice, your own characters, your own setting. Everything should be your own. This isn’t a simple rewrite for practice. I want you to write a scene that reflects the same mood, evokes the same emotions, and handles plot in the same way, but that is still completely your own work.

Scene Challenge of the Week

Time flies sometimes. In just five weeks from this Saturday, I’ll be a married man. That’s pretty exciting as it is, but I’m also marrying a truly awesome woman. Relationships are difficult sometimes. It takes work to get to know each others, and more work to keep in touch, and even more work to really get a lot with each other and be a true blessing to one another’s lives. Still, it’s definitely worth it. The effort, the work, the drama, and everything else that goes with relationships 1) make you a better person, and 2) make the relationship that you’re in a better relationship (at least when both people are involved in the work). So, like I said, definitely worth it. Anyway, it’s Wednesday, which means that you get a scene challenge. If you can’t remember the rules, I’ll provide them: I provide you with specific rules for how to write a particular scene.  Try to keep your scene under five hundred words, and try to keep it in the same tone as the introduction.  If I give a line that is very dark and depressing, then I don’t want to see a scene about a drunken monkey in a tutu…it just doesn’t fit.  If I do give you a line about a drunken monkey in a tutu, then you should probably try for a funny scene.

Your rules: You task this week is to write a scene of at least 150 words that is all one sentence. If you’ve been following the blog then you’ve seen this challenge before. Remember to make sure that the scene is grammatically correct, and that it flows well. Again, you might want to give it to a grammar nazi after you finish to make sure that your grammar is solid. Your cue: “I just want to be…”

Scene Challenge of the Week

FrogSo, by tonight I’ll be hanging out with Alayna, which makes me very happy. I have to say that I’m excited to see her. Anyway, it’s Wednesday, which means that you get a scene challenge. If you can’t remember the rules, I’ll provide them: I provide you with specific rules for how to write a particular scene.  Try to keep your scene under five hundred words, and try to keep it in the same tone as the introduction.  If I give a line that is very dark and depressing, then I don’t want to see a scene about a drunken monkey in a tutu…it just doesn’t fit.  If I do give you a line about a drunken monkey in a tutu, then you should probably try for a funny scene.

Your rules: You task this week is to write a scene of at least 150 words that is all one sentence. If you’ve been following the blog then you’ve seen this challenge before. Remember to make sure that the scene is grammatically correct, and that it flows well. Again, you might want to give it to a grammar nazi after you finish to make sure that your grammar is solid. Your cue: “Okay, for the third time…”

Scene Challenge of the Week

lizardWelcome to Wednesday! I have to admit that I always pronounce it ‘Wed-Nes-Day’ in my head just so that I can remember how to spell the word. Spelling in English can be… wonky at best sometimes. Anyway, it’s time for a scene challenge, and this week’s challenge is just going to be a normal (if there is such a thing) scene challenge. So, you know the rules: I give you a prompt and you write a scene off of it.  Try to keep your scene under five hundred words, and try to keep it in the same tone as the introduction.  If I give a line that is very dark and depressing, then I don’t want to see a scene about a drunken monkey in a tutu…it just doesn’t fit.  If I do give you a line about a drunken monkey in a tutu, then you should probably try for a funny scene.

Your prompt: “Karak-tor stared blankly at the stone club in his scaled claw…”

Alright, have fun with this!!

Scene Challenge of the Week

(Photo Credit)
(Photo Credit)

Welcome of June! I hope everyone’s having a good beginning of the month. I’m also happy about the new writers on the blog. So, it’s time for a scene challenge today, so I hope you’ve got your thinking caps on. Alright, you should know the rules by now, but it you don’t: I provide you with specific rules for how to write a particular scene.  Try to keep your scene under five hundred words, and try to keep it in the same tone as the introduction.  If I give a line that is very dark and depressing, then I don’t want to see a scene about a drunken monkey in a tutu…it just doesn’t fit.  If I do give you a line about a drunken monkey in a tutu, then you should probably try for a funny scene.

Your rules: You task this week is to write a scene of at least 300 words that is all one sentence. If you’ve been following the blog then you’ve seen this challenge before. Remember to make sure that the scene is grammatically correct, and that it flows well. Again, you might want to give it to a grammar nazi after you finish to make sure that your grammar is solid. Your cue: “She had the most beautiful blue eyes…”

Scene Challenge of the Week

Well, spring is here and March is just about over! I hope all of you are ready for rain! If you know what I mean by that… well… I’d guess that your probably not under 25. Anyway, I hope everyone is having a great year so far, and that the new variety in challenge posts is helpful! So, this week’s scene challenge is one that you’ve done before, but only once… or at least only once here. If you don’t remember the rules, here you go:  I provide you with specific rules for how to write a particular scene.  Try to keep your scene under five hundred words, and try to keep it in the same tone as the introduction.  If I give a line that is very dark and depressing, then I don’t want to see a scene about a drunken monkey in a tutu…it just doesn’t fit.  If I do give you a line about a drunken monkey in a tutu, then you should probably try for a funny scene.

Your challenge: Choose one of your favorite scenes from a novel. After reading the scene a couple of times, rewrite it in your own style and voice. The characters and basic elements of the scene should remain the same, but the way it is written should reflect your voice and style of writing, rather than the original author’s. This can be very challenging, so don’t be too disappointed if you need a few tries to go it well.

Finding your own voice is very important in writing, and it’s often one of the hardest things to do. Instead of trying to write like your favorite authors, figure out how you write!

Scene Challenge of the Week

110160136_fa231cc7b0Well, spring officially starts tomorrow! Of course, where I live we never really had a winter, so I’m not entirely sure that matters… of course… my definition of winter is somewhat skewed by growing up in New England. I’m still waiting for it to actually get cold here, and I have been for the last eleven years. Obviously I don’t really expect it to happen. It’s time for another scene challenge today, so if you need to catch up, here are the rules:  I provide you with specific rules for how to write a particular scene.  Try to keep your scene under five hundred words, and try to keep it in the same tone as the introduction.  If I give a line that is very dark and depressing, then I don’t want to see a scene about a drunken monkey in a tutu…it just doesn’t fit.  If I do give you a line about a drunken monkey in a tutu, then you should probably try for a funny scene.

Your challenge: Go out people watching with a friend. As you watch, try to write a scene of a little over 300 words describing what you see. When you’ve both finished your scenes, trade and read what the other person wrote. How did your perspective and personality affect the scene that you wrote? What did each of you focus on? What details are present in both stories, and what details are unique to each? Consider your particular viewpoints, attitudes, beliefs, and emotional connections. How did each of this affect your scene?

This can be a great exercise to make you think about how you write and why you write that way! Have fun!

Scene Challenge of the Week

What do you get when you cross a skunk with a gorilla? Want to know? If so you’ll have to wait till next week for the answer to that witty bit of repartee. For now let’s get on to this week’s scene challenge! You probably know the rules, but here they are for the new people:  I provide you with specific rules for how to write a particular scene.  Try to keep your scene under five hundred words, and try to keep it in the same tone as the introduction.  If I give a line that is very dark and depressing, then I don’t want to see a scene about a drunken monkey in a tutu…it just doesn’t fit.  If I do give you a line about a drunken monkey in a tutu, then you should probably try for a funny scene.

Your rules: This week you must write a 300+ word scene using sentences of no more than six words. Again, if you’ve been following the blog, then you’ve done this before. If you do this correctly then you should have at least 50 sentences in your scene. Your cue: ‘Alex dropped the ball. …’

Have fun with this one!

Scene Challenge of the Week

dead-leavesWell, we’re out of February and into March, and one of my regular commenters has a birthday tomorrow. So, Wayne, I just want to say happy birthday, and thanks for the comments! Your input is always appreciated, even when we disagree. It’s time for another scene challenge, and if you don’t know the rules:  I provide you with specific rules for how to write a particular scene.  Try to keep your scene under five hundred words, and try to keep it in the same tone as the introduction.  If I give a line that is very dark and depressing, then I don’t want to see a scene about a drunken monkey in a tutu…it just doesn’t fit.  If I do give you a line about a drunken monkey in a tutu, then you should probably try for a funny scene.

Your rules: You task this week is to write a scene of at least 300 words that is all one sentence. If you’ve been following the blog then you’ve seen this challenge before. Remember to make sure that the scene is grammatically correct, and that it flows well. Again, you might want to give it to a grammar nazi after you finish to make sure that your grammar is solid. Your cue: ‘Elsa glared down at the pile of dead leaves…’

And… GO!

Scene Challenge of the Week

bill-bachmann-man-swinging-golf-club-at-sunset_i-G-28-2813-HWXOD00ZIt is absolutely the time of the week for the Scene Challenge! So, I think you probably know the rules, and I’ve done a ton of writing today! So, if you don’t know the rules already… you can check out last week’s scene challenge.

So… your challenge: Write a scene of at least 300 words that has no adjectives in it. Do your best to give strong vivid descriptions focusing on action, but remember, no adjectives. Your scene: ‘Kellen gripped the handle of his golf club like someone was trying to steal it…’

Enjoy!