Memories_of_Ice_by_Steven_Erikson_Limited_Edition_Cover_200_303So, my lovely fiancee is back up in Virginia, more’s the pity. However, soon we’ll have more than a day together every now and then. It’s just a matter of getting through the next two months without dying from stress. I’m submitting the outline for my massive term paper today (40 pages… which will probably wind up turning into fifty pages…), and hopefully the professor will approve it. If not, well… things could get interesting. I’ve also got a general idea for my shorter paper (only 20 pages) which seems to be coming together nicely and I’m quite happy about that. Anyway, it’s time for a scene challenge. If you can’t remember the rules, I’ll provide them: I provide you with specific rules for how to write a particular scene.  Try to keep your scene under five hundred words, and try to keep it in the same tone as the introduction.  If I give a line that is very dark and depressing, then I don’t want to see a scene about a drunken monkey in a tutu…it just doesn’t fit.  If I do give you a line about a drunken monkey in a tutu, then you should probably try for a funny scene.

Your Challenge: I want you to write a gritty scene. This is going to be a variation of the movie/book scene challenges we’ve done in the past. Choose one of your favorite scenes from a good book or movie that evokes a morbid sense of humor. If you’ve ever read Steven Ericson’s Deadhouse Gates or Memories of Ice then you’ll have a good idea of the kind of tone and feel that I’m talking about. However, instead of simply rewriting the scene, I want you to write a version of what happens that is entirely your own. Your own voice, your own characters, your own setting. Everything should be your own. This isn’t a simple rewrite for practice. I want you to write a scene that reflects the same mood, evokes the same emotions, and handles plot in the same way, but that is still completely your own work.

Advertisements

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s